How North Carolina’s Population Will Change Over the Next 20 Years | North Carolina

0

Every year, millions of Americans pack up and move to a new state – whether for work, family reasons, a changing climate, or a number of other reasons. Migration and natural population change resulting from births and deaths can lead to significant demographic changes, which affect local economies and governments.

Negative or slow population growth can lead to lower economic growth and fewer economic opportunities, which in turn can push more people out of a given state. Population decline can also mean reduced revenue for state governments and limited funding for public works and services and reduced ability to meet budget obligations. Here is an overview of the states that collect the most income taxes.

According to a study conducted by the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service at the University of Virginia, the population of North Carolina is projected to increase by 19.8% between 2020 and 2040, an increase of 2,090,894 people. If the Cooper Center’s projections hold true, North Carolina will jump from the ninth-most populous state to the seventh-most populous state, taking into account demographic shifts in other states as well.

The projected change is consistent with the trend of the past decade. Between 2010 and 2020, the number of people living in North Carolina increased by 10.8%, or 1,032,550 people.

A full methodological explanation of how these projections were calculated can be found here.

Rank name Population projected from 2020 to 2040. change (%) Population 2020 Ranking 2020 Projected population in 2040 2040 rank
1 Texas 35.2 29,604,099 2 40,015,913 2
2 North Dakota 34.3 789 403 47 1,060,457 45
3 Utah 34.1 3,240,569 30 4,344,339 29
4 Florida 32.0 21,877,257 3 28,886,983 3
5 Colorado 31.7 5,843,359 20 7,692,907 17
6 Nevada 30.1 3,119,265 32 4,058,371 30
7 Washington 27.3 7,681,818 13 9,776,126 12
8 Arizona 26.1 7,268,694 14 9,166,279 14
9 Idaho 25.4 1,777,249 39 2,227,842 36
ten Caroline from the south 22.5 5,184,564 23 6,352,502 22
11 Oregon 21.0 4,267,534 27 5,164,041 24
12 North Carolina 19.8 10,568,033 9 12,658,927 7
13 Georgia 19.5 10,725,351 8 12,820,271 5
14 Delaware 17.9 987 393 45 1,164,344 44
15 South Dakota 17.0 891 688 46 1,043,032 47
16 Montana 15.0 1,074,635 43 1,236,304 43
17 California 14.9 40,438,640 1 46,467,001 1
18 Virginia 14.1 8,655,021 12 9,876,728 11
19 Tennessee 14.0 6,861,856 16 7,823,662 15
20 Minnesota 12.0 5,683,666 22 6,364,886 20
21 Nebraska 12.0 1,956,876 37 2,190,918 37
22 Hawaii 11.4 1,453,902 40 1,619,703 40
23 Maryland 11.1 6,161,345 19 6,842,902 19
24 Oklahoma 10.9 4,001,180 28 4,439,038 28
25 Massachusetts 10.9 6,982,092 15 7,742,628 16
26 Alaska 9.1 751,328 48 819 954 48
27 Louisiana 6.7 4,742,900 25 5,062,780 25
28 Iowa 6.5 3,184,240 31 3,392,783 32
29 Arkansas 5.9 3,038,491 33 3,217,535 33
30 Indiana 5.3 6,737,581 17 7,095,000 18
31 Wyoming 5.2 585 380 50 615 787 49
32 Kentucky 4.8 4,498,533 26 4,714,761 27
33 new York 4.2 20,031,150 4 20,873,488 4
34 New Jersey 4.2 9,088,074 11 9,470,012 13
35 Kansas 3.3 2,936,212 35 3,032,653 34
36 Missouri 3.2 6,161,471 18 6,359,970 21
37 New Hampshire 3.0 1,352,917 41 1,393,451 41
38 Alabama 3.0 4,911,278 24 5,056,796 26
39 Wisconsin 2.7 5,837,176 21 5,997,137 23
40 New Mexico 1.3 2,099,134 36 2,127,318 38
41 Ohio 0.4 11,705,262 7 11,751,540 9
42 Pennsylvania -0.3 12,844,885 5 12,809,150 6
43 Michigan -0.3 9,992,315 ten 9,960,115 ten
44 Rhode Island -0.7 1,062,334 44 1,055,318 46
45 Maine -0.9 1,338,780 42 1,326,159 42
46 Mississippi -0.9 2,990,498 34 2,962,160 35
47 Connecticut -1.4 3,593,542 29 3,542,707 31
48 Illinois -3.1 12,791,188 6 12,397,564 8
49 Vermont -3.4 622 868 49 601 865 50
50 West Virginia -7.8 1 801 966 38 1,661,849 39
Share.

Comments are closed.